Canine Parvovirus

Regardless of whether an infected canine parvovirus case appears at home or in larger, multiple-dog environments, such as breeding facilities and vet clinics, it is important that correct hygiene measures are taken to clean and disinfect the contaminated areas. Canine parvovirus is extremely resistant to most disinfectants. Canine parvovirus can remain viable for months to years, especially in a dark, moist environment; however, there are many ways (both chemical and physical) to remove contaminating organisms from surfaces.

There are certain things you should do any time you are cleaning areas potentially infected with canine parvovirus:

  1. The entire facility (both inside and out) must be thoroughly cleaned with a disinfectant that has a specific canine parvovirus kill claim. Apply the disinfectant according to the label instructions.
  2. Avoid the use of mops when possible.
  3. Always utilize disposable shoe/boot covers
  4. Always wear coveralls when cleaning and dispose of them when cleaning a new room or leaving the area you are currently cleaning.
  5. Restrict the use of cleaning materials to individual rooms/areas.
  6. Launder all clothing, bedding, and towels in the hottest water possible.  If possible, use color-safe bleach on all items. Dry articles in a clothes dryer rather than hanging items up to dry.

This is a basic protocol for cleaning a canine-parvovirus-infected environment. You should always ask the homeowner’s veterinarian what the safest and most effective protocol is for their situation.

Note:  For areas such as yards and homes where disinfection is not an option, careful and repeated mechanical cleaning can be effective if applied diligently. Yards can be flushed with water and dried, and a disinfectant with reasonable efficacy in the face of organic matter can be sprayed on the area using a pesticide applicator or hose-end sprayer